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Friday, 25 November 2011

Revolution Times Time To Revolt! Wake Up! The Corporation Full Movie Corrupt Political Financial System Exposed Video Documentary



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Revolution Times, Its Time To Revolt! Wake Up! Understand The Corrupt Political Financial System

The Corporation - (Full Movie) Financial System Exposed Documentary

The Corporation is a 2003 Canadian documentary film written by Joel Bakan, and directed by Mark Achbar and Jennifer Abbott. The documentary is critical of the modern-day corporation, considering its legal status as a class of person and evaluating its behaviour towards society and the world at large as a psychiatrist might evaluate an ordinary person. This is explored through specific examples. The Corporation has been shown worldwide, on television, and via DVD, file sharing, and free download. Bakan wrote the book, The Corporation: The Pathological Pursuit of Profit and Power, during the filming of the documentary.

The documentary shows the development of the contemporary business corporation, from a legal entity that originated as a government-chartered institution meant to effect specific public functions, to the rise of the modern commercial institution entitled to most of the legal rights of a person. One theme is its assessment as a "personality", as a result of an 1886 case in the United States Supreme Court in which a statement by Chief Justice Morrison R. Waite[nb 1] led to corporations as "persons" having the same rights as human beings, based on the Fourteenth Amendment to the United States Constitution. The film's assessment is effected via the diagnostic criteria in the DSM-IV; Robert Hare, a University of British Columbia psychology professor and a consultant to the FBI, compares the profile of the contemporary profitable business corporation to that of a clinically-diagnosed psychopath. The documentary concentrates mostly upon North American corporations, especially those of the United States.

The film is in vignettes examining and criticizing corporate business practices. It establishes parallels between the way corporations are systematically compelled to behave and the DSM-IV's symptoms of psychopathy, i.e. callous disregard for the feelings of other people, the incapacity to maintain human relationships, reckless disregard for the safety of others, deceitfulness (continual lying to deceive for profit), the incapacity to experience guilt, and the failure to conform to social norms and respect for the law.

Topics addressed include the Business Plot, where in 1933, the popular General Smedley Butler exposed a corporate plot against then U.S. President Franklin Roosevelt; the tragedy of the commons; Dwight D. Eisenhower's warning people to beware of the rising military-industrial complex; economic externalities; suppression of an investigative news story about Bovine Growth Hormone on a Fox News Channel affiliate television station; the invention of the soft drink Fanta by the Coca-Cola Company due to the trade embargo on Nazi Germany; the alleged role of IBM in the Nazi holocaust (see IBM and the Holocaust); the Cochabamba protests of 2000 brought on by the privatization of Bolivia's municipal water supply by the Bechtel Corporation; and in general themes of corporate social responsibility, the notion of limited liability, the corporation as a psychopath, and the corporation as a person.


See Also: Banking Financial System Scam Exposed: How Banks Mafia Create Money Out of Nothing

World Banking Financial System Modern Slavery Dictatorship: Why Do Banks Make So Much Money? Video


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Banking Financial System Scam Exposed: How Banks Mafia Create Money Out of Nothing



How Banks Create Money Out of Nothing, Banking Economy Economics Econmic Crisis Monetary System Making Money High Profitabe Cash Deb World Crisis IMF Bailouts, Bank, Banks, Money, Euro, Cash, Dolar, Bucks, Economy, ECB, FED, POUND, GOLD, SILVER
How Banks Create Money Out of Nothing

This article appeared in Prosperity, February 2002

The following is from mainstream economics textbook Success in Economics by Derek Lobley B.A. (London: John Murray Publishers Ltd, 1978 edition), which was part of the “Success Studybooks” series. It was intended to be “appropriate to the Economics syllabuses of many of the professional bodies such as … the Institute of Bankers”. It is published verbatim (but with emphases added) from ch.17, pp. 205-206.



Bank Debt Money Banking System Modern Slavery World Banking Financial System Modern Slavery Dictatorship: Why Do Banks Make So Much Money
Let us imagine an economy in which there is only one bank. Soon after beginning business it finds that individuals and firms have placed £10,000 with it for safe-keeping. Its balance sheet (ignoring the shareholders’ capital or property owned by the bank) would appear as follows:

Balance Sheet 1
LiabilitiesAssets
Customers’ deposits£10,000Cash in hand£10,000
The balance sheet is in effect a photograph of the bank’s position at a particular point in time. The liabilities show the amounts that the bank may be called upon to provide to its customers and the assets show the cash and other resources available to the bank to meets its liabilities.
At this stage it is quite clear that the bank has sufficient cash in its till to meet any demands made by its customers.

In practice customers prefer to settle their debts with each other by cheque, ordering the bank to transfer money from one account to another. Thus if Adam and Brown have each deposited £500 at the bank, and Adam owes Brown £100, he can settle his debt by instructing the bank to reduce his account by £100 and to increase Brown’s by the same amount. No cash changes hands; the bank still has obligations to its customers of £10,000; there has simply been a slight readjustment to those obligations.

If all the bank’s depositors were always prepared to settle their debts in this way the bank could forget all about its holdings of cash. Customers will, however, need to draw a certain amount of cash from the bank each week to make small payments (it is not usual to write cheques for very small amounts) and to pay those people who prefer not to use the banking system.

If the bank discovers that, at the most, the weekly withdrawal of cash amounts to 10 per cent of total deposits, and that this is quickly re-deposited by traders accepting cash payments from customers, then the most cash the bank needs to meet demands from its customers with deposits of £10,000 is actually only £1000.

Alternatively we may take the view that with cash in hand of £10,000 the bank can afford liabilities of £100,000.

In this case let us imagine a customer, Mr Clark, who approaches the bank for a loan of £1000. The bank manager is agreeable and opens an account for him with a credit balance of £1000. Mr Clark can now write cheques to the value of £1000 although he has placed no money in the bank; he simply promises to repay the £1000 plus interest, having probably offered some security to the bank. The bank’s balance sheet (2) now shows a different picture:

Balance Sheet 2
LiabilitiesAssets
Customers’ deposits£11,000Cash in hand£10,000
Total£11,000Loans to Customers£1,000
(or promises to repay by customers)
Total£11,000
There is now insufficient cash to supply all the customers if they wished to withdraw their deposits, but the bank knows that the most that is likely to be withdrawn is £1100.

It will, therefore, be prepared to go on making loans (or creating credit, which is the same thing) until the cash that is held is equivalent to only 10 per cent of deposits (as per Balance Sheet 3):

Balance Sheet 3
LiabilitiesAssets
Customers’ deposits£100,000Cash in hand£10,000
Total£100,000Loans to Customers£90,000
(or promises to repay by customers)
Total£100,000
So far as customers are concerned the standing of their account is the same whether they have actually deposited cash to open the account or whether it has been created by a loan. When they spend their money the recipient has no means of knowing whether or not they originally deposited cash.
Thus in creating credit the banks have added to the money supply.

See also: World Banking Financial System Modern Slavery Dictatorship: Why Do Banks Make So Much Money? Video


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